The gift, share it.

Life is too short! 

Heard that one before? At some point in your career, there will come a morning when you’ll awake and ask yourself, “What am I really doing?” It’s at this point that earning money by making/selling ‘stuff’ will no longer be motivation enough. However, if your answer to that question reflects a specific, greater purpose, you’ll have the energy and inspiration to continue, it’s your purpose.

How about your employees? Those you work with, or your co-workers, are really no different than you. They also want to feel that they are contributing to a greater good, something more meaningful than putting in the hours and earning the money. What’s different with colleagues, though, is that unlike you, the business owner, they may not have that innate sense of what the business’s purpose is. It needs to be articulated, so the whole of the company is of one mind, moving in the same direction for the same reason. Driven by purpose.

Your customers, what’s it mean to them? Will people buy your products just because your business serves a greater purpose? Generally not. Most people need to realise some kind of specific, tangible benefit from their purchases. So given you are providing benefits, many customers, especially new customers, the millennials are keen to look beyond their bottom line to support organisations that are cause/purpose driven …

Purpose. It has impact. Your community may be the rural outpost or the large city in which your business operates. Increasingly, our communities, our local surroundings are our world, all of which needs a variety of help. In many ways, business represents the best way to bring about significant change to communities. Bringing value through change is where the purpose driven organisation can benefit, a purpose-driven business generates an influence that in many ways are profound, much more far-reaching and impactful.

Your own Purpose? You know your compelling reason. Whether faith, community, legacy or your own personal goals. Either way, purpose is a work in progress. Share your gift.

community network

Community-focused networking has lots of benefits, some are immediately evident, others need clarification and I was witness to this just recently as around twenty met over ‘brunch.’

Our guest was Michael has a lot of domestic responsibility, being the ‘office at home’ and supporting two young kids. He loved the idea of opportunity through engagement, connecting with others in business. The same for many sharing a similar routine these days …

‘Great business today Charlie, met some good people and so glad I accepted your invitation.’

It’s taking that first step, isn’t it? That’s where the intimidation lies, right? Stepping outside of the ‘comfort zone’ into an alien landscape, we all become moulded by our routines and I think Michael was no exception.

With a greater number working from the home office, we soon realise the value of people.

‘I didn’t know what to expect really. Although, I was half expecting the selly-sell, and/or the ‘sign-up’ so today was a refreshing change.’

‘Yes Michael, it is good to have you with us and course there are those who come along fishing for business, with focus on the referral. Others Michael, are just as happy to engage views, share the dialogue, focus on areas of passion, of need and the point of view, not to mention collaboration and to ultimately sample the ‘culture.’

Business is at times a secondary consideration – or ‘the bonus’ as some put it.

Seems to me, the development of community engagement is important, not least because it inspires better efficiencies by creating belonging. Along with a clear infrastructure, community helps us all, in whatever line business.

Most especially, those working from the home office.

‘Happy people mean a happy business, right?’

True Michael, cultivating the community network has enabled many to plan for the realisation of longer-term goals, the chance to step away from the monthly/quarterly led management figures and visualise the ‘bigger picture’.

Cultivating community delivers so much more. Community inspires relationships, affinity, infrastructure and ultimately the trust – then comes referral.

Meaningful emotional links ,,,

Is the lack of the emotional connection hindering your chances for successful business growth?

The ‘getting to know you’ can be tedious for some. Especially in today’s crowded business environment.

“Deadlines don’t allow for emotional tedium … do they?”

Take social media, most of us have experience of the ‘add,’ ‘like,’ the ‘share’ or the ‘follow’ … it’s all part in qualifying through social media. We feel good connecting, we become part of an on line community.

The ‘selly’ is  online isn’t it? We naturally gravitate to those we are connected to, those who share common ground, it’s a pretty straight forward engagement due to that lack of emotional connection. The commitment.

Back to the ‘real world’ now. How often do you see the uninitiated blatantly promote their goods and services to the new audience without so much as a request to meet or even participate in a knowledge swap. There is no time for the ’emo-connection.’

To my mind the most important legacy of social media – so far – has been in exposing the true value of real time engagement. True there is a qualification of togetherness through social although the ‘real time’ skills are often lost …

People buy from people who they know and who they trust.

Good solid relationships in business, like anywhere else take time.

We could do a lot worse for our business (and for our reputation) than ask those in our community for a little time to meet, just so we could find out a little more about each other?