Your story?

So, what’s your story?

How do you, stick in the mind?

All around us, media often appears full of ‘stuff’ designed ~ just for you ~ right at ‘peak times,’ perhaps the ‘stuff’ hits you just before you jump in the car and head off to the office … over the car radio, during lunch break, the commute home maybe. Everywhere there are stories to stick in your face so that it’s stuck in your mind.

So, the way I see it, being sticky can be useful if we are to be successful in business life. Business/life, closely aligned, right?

Think about how people remember you. What do they recall of you when next you catch up or more importantly when they meet up with mutual friends at the regular network soirée?

Being a witness to the conversation, would it be something you’d expect? Are you remembered as being the best that you can be?

The thing is, every interaction we have with someone leaves an impression, sometimes a lasting one. So for me (I know this is also true for many of my close friends), it’s important that MY STORY is a faithful representation of what others expect of me, each time we meet up.

Why? Because each of us is our own mini media outlet.

‘What?’ I hear you say, just hang on a minute, bear with me for a second …

It’s true. What kind of sticky are you? What stories do you conjure, what memories evoked, how do people see you in their life? It’s just the same as that current ‘hot’ company vying for your time and attention before you’ve even ordered the best-ever morning coffee and … the cake!

Showing kindness on a regular basis is important. Agreed. Love? That’s a no-brainer for me as well, but in today’s ‘circus’ of life … if we are to really embrace the power of relationships, affinity and trust let’s leave the right messages out there. Better still, let’s ensure our closest allies see our true colours and have every chance of passing the message that YOU and your story are that which is best remembered, most easily referred.

December, morning coffee…

It was a typically dark, cold December morning and I was more than pleased when Natasha (and coffee) arrived, just as I surveyed the setting for today’s business over breakfast.

We wouldn’t be alone for long though, as approaching headlights suggested the first of our company this morning were on their way.

Nice and early Martin!’ I said, glancing at the clock on the clubhouse wall, 06.45.

Courtesy of the ‘Missus,’ Charlie. My car had broken-down over the weekend so Sue and the kids kindly offered a lift, they needed to be at school early anyway … I’ll be meeting ‘Bruce the garage’ here as he’s running me back after today’s meeting to attend the vehicle.

‘Sounds like a plan Martin.’

The tail-lights of ‘taxi Sue’s’ car receded in the distance, dawn was finally on its way as were others for our weekly business meeting.

Even in the midst of winter, we enjoyed a good attendance, plenty of interaction, lots of  discussion, the business flowed and with a near full-house … apart from ‘Bruce the garage.’

Martin had received a message to say he’d been called out for ‘an emergency’ and that he’d be in touch asap.

‘The best-laid plans eh, Martin?’

Any chance of a lift over my way Charlie?

Among those at the meeting, someone managed the lift Martin needed with an added bonus … the driver knew he could hook-up Martin with an alternative local garage – a ‘start-up’ looking for more business so it wasn’t long before Martin was back on the road and ‘taxi Sue’ back in the old routine.

‘Bruce the garage’ had left an impression, sadly nothing to enamour his reputation as the ‘go to’ service either.

Today in business, relationships matter. Even more so if you are a service provider, business is personal. It’s not what you have or what you can do that impresses your next best client, it’s how you relate.

Better together

 

Bob arrived, pulled up a chair and reclined with a cup of what appeared to be hot chocolate …

‘So, what do you say, Bob? I asked.’

~

Getting good players is easy. Getting those good players to play together is the hard part.” 

It’s so true don’t you think? A quote by Casey Stengel, I thought this was ‘right up our street.’ Just about sums up the development of our referral network, don’t you think?

‘A good one Bob, yes, I like this one as well, collaboration is a huge part of the business. Especially so for the small business.

OK, I get that, what do you say though, when you meet someone who doubts the value of collaboration?

‘It depends on circumstances Bob, we’re all different, aren’t we? Some don’t value it. Others may be wary of the thought of relinquishing the reins of business, perhaps it’s uncomfortable for them. Some of us fear ‘control’ may be lost when meeting new people, developing those new relationships and trust.

Being aware that we are working for ourselves is great for the soul. No matter whether you’re employed, or whether you have your own business Bob. I remember that as soon as I understood the value, of sharing views and opinions outside of the workplace, the sooner I learn to embrace the opportunity and many benefits good relations bring through my network, the human collateral. We’re never truly ‘going it along.’

Sharing the wear?

‘Sharing the chocolate perhaps? Yes, that’s about it, although in my case? More like taking my head out of the sand.

So networking is not about money?

‘Bob, the value of collaboration goes beyond ‘making money’… through collaboration we learn to think differently, we’re inspired while educating and sharing strengths. Networking is the opportunity to develop strong connections with ready-made marketing expertise, finance wizards, creatives and much more. All developed through networking. We’re richer before we know it.

So, engaging others makes you more profitable?

‘We’re immediately better off when we meet someone new Bob. By making the human connection, by offering help and support when required – and not simply at a professional level … networking is hugely educational and can help solve many doubts and dilemmas, even before they materialise.

Henry Ford said it best.

Coming together is a beginning, staying together is progress and working together is success.”

My quote is better though Charlie.

‘Better together, Bob.’

community network

Community-focused networking has lots of benefits, some are immediately evident, others need clarification and I was witness to this just recently as around twenty met over ‘brunch.’

Our guest was Michael has a lot of domestic responsibility, being the ‘office at home’ and supporting two young kids. He loved the idea of opportunity through engagement, connecting with others in business. The same for many sharing a similar routine these days …

‘Great business today Charlie, met some good people and so glad I accepted your invitation.’

It’s taking that first step, isn’t it? That’s where the intimidation lies, right? Stepping outside of the ‘comfort zone’ into an alien landscape, we all become moulded by our routines and I think Michael was no exception.

With a greater number working from the home office, we soon realise the value of people.

‘I didn’t know what to expect really. Although, I was half expecting the selly-sell, and/or the ‘sign-up’ so today was a refreshing change.’

‘Yes Michael, it is good to have you with us and course there are those who come along fishing for business, with focus on the referral. Others Michael, are just as happy to engage views, share the dialogue, focus on areas of passion, of need and the point of view, not to mention collaboration and to ultimately sample the ‘culture.’

Business is at times a secondary consideration – or ‘the bonus’ as some put it.

Seems to me, the development of community engagement is important, not least because it inspires better efficiencies by creating belonging. Along with a clear infrastructure, community helps us all, in whatever line business.

Most especially, those working from the home office.

‘Happy people mean a happy business, right?’

True Michael, cultivating the community network has enabled many to plan for the realisation of longer-term goals, the chance to step away from the monthly/quarterly led management figures and visualise the ‘bigger picture’.

Cultivating community delivers so much more. Community inspires relationships, affinity, infrastructure and ultimately the trust – then comes referral.

Plant with care

Plant with care, weed with purpose

Long ago I was advised I should be hanging on to those business cards … ‘you never know when it may come in useful.’

Trouble is, I’ve just taken a look at around 25yrs worth of hanging on to business cards and I’ve come to the conclusion that 60% of these need to go…

‘Have you reached-out?’ I hear you say.

‘Don’t wait for the business, drop them a line with an update … include them in your newsletter, stay in mind.’ Yes, yes and I hear you again… but no.

Hey, I’ve been there, done that and I’m not so sure today’s networker has intentions for the long-term. Taking the advice though, half of those I included in updates had moved on, or sadly died. Half again seem to be only ‘in it’ for the now, so no. I’ve new purpose.

These days there are a core bunch of connections with whom I have a natural affinity. I see most of them on a regular basis and I value their advice and support.

I’ve learned over the years to select your close connections and cultivate with care. I look past the commercial engagement and seek more intrinsic values. I’m happy now to be comfortable in my shoes, happy where I sit in this place. Is this so bad?

So selecting my mates, my business connections, those whom I am prepared to spend time with in getting to know and trust is important to me. These are the people I can count on ‘for the journey.’

‘So what happens when someone else reaches out to you, do you accept the invitation?’ I hear you ask.

Sure, we need to engage and be prepared to offer help when it’s required, I believe that’s part of human nature, although if in ‘follow-up’ (and we all follow-up, don’t we?) the communication is lost, then I’m a little more mercenary on with whom I gift my time these days.

For me, cultivating new connections in business is a little like gardening. I’m more prone to plant and care more selectively, I’ve also developed a passion for recovering the space taken up by anything/anyone simply coming along for the ride …